430 Enfield St, Enfield
CT 06082
Call Us
(860) 265-7890
Text Us
860-879-8999

appt@smileora.net
sunnysmiles@smileora.net

TOOTHBRUSH

We know and love our toothbrushes as the tools that kick plaque to the curb, help keep cavities at bay (with the help of fluoride toothpaste, of course) and freshen our breath. But what else can we learn about them? Read on for some toothbrush facts.

– The toothbrush is 5,000 years old.
In various forms, that is. Ancient civilizations used a “chew stick,” a thin twig with a frayed end, to remove food from their teeth. Over time, toothbrushes evolved and were made from bone, wood or ivory handles and stiff bristles of hogs, boars or other animals. The modern nylon-bristled toothbrush we use today was invented in 1938.

– When selecting your toothbrush, look for the ADA Seal.The ADA Seal of Acceptance is the gold standard for toothbrush quality. It’s how you’ll know an independent body of scientific experts, the ADA Council on Scientific Affairs, evaluated your toothbrush to make sure bristles won’t fall out with normal use, the handle will stay strong and the toothbrush will help reduce your risk for cavities and gum disease.

– The first mass-produced toothbrush was invented in prison.In 1770, an Englishman named William Addis was jailed for inciting a riot. He saw fellow prisoners using a rag covered in soot or salt to clean their teeth. Addis saved an animal bone from dinner and received bristles from a guard. Accounts state he bored tiny holes into the bone, inserted the bristles and sealed them with glue. After his release, he modified his prototype, started a company and manufactured his toothbrush. That company, Wisdom Toothbrushes, still exists in the United Kingdom today.

– Manual or powered? Your teeth don’t care.In the manual and powered toothbrush debate, it’s a wash. You just need to brush twice a day for two minutes with a fluoride toothpaste. (If your toothpaste has the ADA Seal, you’ll know it has fluoride.) Both types of toothbrush can effectively and thoroughly clean your teeth. It all depends on which one you prefer. People who find it difficult to use a manual toothbrush may find a powered toothbrush more comfortable. Talk to your dentist about which kind is best for you.

– There is no “correct” order for brushing and flossing.Brushing before flossing, flossing before brushing—it doesn’t matter to your teeth, as long as you do both.

– Toothbrushes like to be left out in the open.Cleaning your toothbrush is easy: Rinse it with tap water to remove any remaining toothpaste and debris. Store it upright and allow it to air dry. If you store your toothbrush with other toothbrushes, make sure they are separated to prevent cross contamination. And do not routinely cover toothbrushes or store them in closed containers. A moist environment such as a closed container is more conducive to the growth of unwanted bacteria than the open air.

– Lifespan = 3-4 MonthsMake sure to replace your toothbrush every three to four months, or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won’t do as good of a job cleaning your teeth.

– When it comes to choosing a brush, go soft.Whether you use a manual or powered toothbrush, choose a soft-bristled brush. Firm or even medium-strength bristles may cause damage to your gums and enamel. When brushing your teeth, don’t scrub vigorously—only brush hard enough to clean the film off your teeth. Your fluoride toothpaste will do the rest of the work.

– Remember: 2 minutes, 2 times a day.4 minutes a day goes a long way for your dental health. Put the time in each day to keep your smile healthy and keep up this twice-a-day habit.

– Sharing is caring, but not for toothbrushes.Sharing a toothbrush can mean you’re also sharing germs and bacteria. This could be a particular concern if you have a cold or flu to spread, or you have a condition that leaves your immune system compromised.
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TOOTHPASTE

Toothpaste is a key part of your daily oral hygiene routine. Along with your toothbrush and floss it helps to remove food debris and plaque from your teeth and gums.
 
Toothpastes can come in a gel, paste or powder form. While the ingredients differ slightly, all toothpastes contain the same general components:
 
– Mild abrasive. With some help from your toothbrush, these help to remove debris and surface stains.
– Humectants. This ingredient helps to prevent water loss, and keeps your toothpaste from drying out or getting gummy.
– Flavoring agents. This is what gives your toothpaste a little bit of sweetness, and that minty fresh scent. Since these do not contain sugar, they also do not promote tooth decay.
– Thickening agents. Also known as binders, these help to stabilize the toothpaste formula.
– Detergent. That foaming action comes from detergent. It also helps to spread the toothpaste through your whole mouth, and helps clean teeth.
They may have all the same basic ingredients, but all toothpastes are not the same. Depending on the toothpaste, other ingredients can also be added for other benefits. Here are some important things to keep in mind when choosing your toothpaste:
– Decay prevention. Fluoride is a natural cavity fighter that helps to strengthen tooth enamel and fight tooth decay. Not all toothpastes contain fluoride. Be sure to always use toothpaste containing this cavity-fighting mineral.
– Plaque and gingivitis. Several toothpaste contain active ingredients that can fight plaque and gingivitis, an early form of gum disease.
– Whitening. If you’re looking for a little extra sparkle in your smile, “whitening” toothpastes have special chemical or polishing agents that help remove more surface stains than regular toothpastes.
– Desensitizing. If you have sensitive teeth, you may want to consider using a desensitizing toothpaste. These contain compounds which help to reduce tooth sensitivity.

Finally, always look for the ADA Seal when selecting toothpaste. The Seal helps you make sure you are choosing the best toothpaste for your dental needs. It’s also your assurance that the toothpaste has met the ADA criteria for safety and effectiveness, and that it does what it says. Visit the ADA website for more information about the ADA Seal of Acceptance and toothpaste.

Where Art meets Science to create Beautiful Smiles
Quality Dental Care at an Affordable price

430 Enfield St, Enfield, CT 06082

 

(860) 265-7890

 

206-426-1039

 

dentalcare@smileora.net

 

Our Services

WHITE FILLINGS

ROOT CANAL

CROWN AND BRIDGE

DENTURES

IMPLANTS


CLEAR BRACES

ORAL SURGERY


MISC


Opening Hours

Monday                                         9 am-6 pm(alternate)

Tuesday                                         9 am-6 pm

Wednesday                                   9 am-6 pm

Thursday                                        9 am-6 pm

Friday                                             9 am-6 pm

Saturday                                    8 am-2 pm(alternate)